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Kung Pao Chicken recipe

According to Wikipedia, Kung Pau Chickenis a classic dish in Sichuan cuisine, originating in the SichuanProvince of central-western China. Allegedly, the dish is namedafter Ding Baozhen (1820-1886), a late Qing Dynasty official.Born in Guizhou, Ding served as head of Shandong province andlater as governor of Sichuan province. His title was Gong Bao(??), or palatial guardian. The name ‘Kung Pao’ chicken is derivedfrom this title. In America, this spicy dish is a favorite itemon the menu in Chinese restaurants, so get out your wok and enjoythis ‘kicking chicken’ it at home!

Recipe: Kung Pao Chicken

2 boneless, skinless, chicken breast halves,cubed1 egg white, lightly beaten2 teaspoons cornstarch2 tablespoons black bean sauce*2 tablespoons water1 garlic clove, finely minced1 tablespoon hoisin sauce*1 tablespoon rice vinegar2 teaspoon sherry1 teaspoon granulated sugar3 tablespoons vegetable oil1/2 cup raw unsalted peanuts1 to 2 dried red chilies, crushed (or1 teaspoon dried red pepper flakes)Hot cooked rice (optional)

  • Combine chicken, egg white and cornstarchin small bowl.
  • Mix next 7 ingredients in another smallbowl. Set sauce aside.
  • Heat oil in wok or heavy large skilletover medium-high heat. Add peanuts and chilies and cook untilpeanuts are golden brown, about 1 minute. Remove with a slottedspoon and set aside.
  • Increase heat to high. Add chicken mixtureand stir-fry until chicken is lightly browned, about 1 to 2 minutes.Reduce heat to medium. Return peanuts to wok/pan. Add sauce andblend thoroughly. Cook until heated through, about 1 to 1 1/2minutes. Serve immediately over hot cooked rice, if desired.

    *Available in Asian Specialty Markets.

    Makes 2 servings.


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    Chicken and shrimp are cooked with spicy chiles and bell peppers in this Chinese restaurant favorite.


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